antiqueweek.com
Auctions • Shows • Antiques • Collectibles
  
Search through 1000s of auctions listings by keyword.
Elite Auction
Recent Archives
Clayton Moore’s Lone Ranger gear on the block
Skull pulled from auction for possible Civil War connection
Exploring Calvin and Hobbes exhibit celebrates artistry of comics
Pablo Picasso’s The Blue Room gets high-tech scrutiny
Hard-to-find Americana does well at Cowan’s
   
News Article
Nazi-looted art discovered in an apartment in Munich
BERLIN, Germany (AP) — The German government says it is helping Bavarian prosecutors investigate a huge art find related to pieces seized by the Nazis from Jews and art that the Nazis considered “degenerate.”

Focus magazine reported on Nov. 2 that about 1,500 works by such masters as Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse and Emil Nolde were found in a Munich apartment in early 2011 but gave no sources for its information.

Bavarian prosecutors declined to confirm or deny the report.

Asked about the Focus report, German government spokesman Steffen Seibert said authorities in Berlin are aware of the case and are supplying “advice from experts in the field of so-called ’degenerate art’ and ... Nazi-looted art.”

Investigators searched the apartment in an upscale Munich district in February 2012, as part of a tax investigation that started with a routine check on a Zurich-Munich train in late 2010.

Authorities said they found 121 framed and 1,285 unframed works — including 20th century masters such as Max Liebermann and Ernst Ludwig Kirchner and earlier works by artists including Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Gustave Courbet, Auguste Renoir and Canaletto. The oldest work dates back to the 16th century.

Prosecutor Reinhard Nemetz told reporters in the Bavarian city of Augsburg that investigators have turned up “concrete evidence” that at least some of the works were seized by the Nazis from their owners or classed by them as “degenerate art” and seized from German museums in 1937 or shortly after.

“Degenerate art” was largely modern or abstract works by artists that the regime of Adolf Hitler believed to be a corruption influence on the German people. Their “deviant” characteristics were often attributed to Jewish corruption.

Officials are investigating whether the suspect in the case was in wrongful possession of the paintings. They wouldn’t identify him and said they don’t know where he is.

The paintings were found in one room at the apartment, where they were “professionally stored and in a very good condition,” said Siegfried Kloeble, the head of the customs investigations office in Munich. He said it took a specialist company three days to remove the paintings from the apartment; officials refused to specify where they are being kept.

Kloeble said investigators “think it’s unlikely that any more paintings were stored elsewhere” by the suspect.

Meike Hoffmann, an expert on “degenerate art” at Berlin’s Free University who is helping the investigation, presented pictures of a selection of works from the collection.

They included a painting by Chagall that Hoffmann said isn’t included in lists of the artist’s work.

“These cases are, of course, of particularly high art history significance for researchers,” she said. Experts haven’t yet been able to determine where the Chagall came from, she added, describing the research as “very, very difficult.”

Hoffmann also presented an unlisted painting by Henri Matisse, apparently dating back to the 1920s.

“When you stand in front of the works, see the ones that were long thought to have been lost or destroyed and in a relatively good state – some of them dirty but not damaged – you have an incredible feeling of happiness,” Hoffmann said.

11/8/2013
Comments For This Post
Post A Comment
Name :
Email :
Comment :